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Goat cheese with sundried tomato tapenade – easy and beautiful and TASTY

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A student holding the goat cheese appetizer

 

 

Each week I talk with Matt Swaim of Sonrise Morning Show about Bible foods & herbs. Today we talked

about:

 

The pine nut mentioned in the Bible is from a certain kind of evergreen found in the Middle East, especially Lebanon (the cedars of Lebanon). They are found in the layers of the pine cones of the stone pine tree.  During harvest, the cones of the tree are shaken to remove the kernel, then the kernels are dried. After that they are processed to remove the kernel from the hard outer shell.  Today pine nuts come from a number of species of pine trees.

In Bible days, they were eaten raw or cooked with other foods.  Even the Roman soldiers ate them because they had strength giving qualities.  The nuts were pounded them with garlic and salt. Then they poured in olive oil to make a tasty spread. Today it’s one of the few nuts that are usually eaten cooked or toasted, not raw.

Toasting pine nuts:  They are so small they burn easily.  I toast them in a 325 degree oven just until they are fragrant, a few minutes and turning golden. Stir from the outside edges in. Or just pour them into a dry skillet and toast over low or medium heat.

RITA’S GOAT CHEESE WITH SUN DRIED TOMATO TAPENADE

Serve with toasted slices of French bread, or crackers.

1/4 cup sundried tomatoes with herbs packed in olive oil, chopped

1 clove garlic, minced

1 nice teaspoon dried rosemary or 1 tablespoon fresh, minced or more to taste – I usually add dmore

1 tablespoon or so of olive oil from sundried tomatoes

1 plum tomato, diced

Handful fresh parsley, chopped

1 log, 8 oz., goat cheese

1 tablespoon pine nuts (OK if you don’t have pine nuts, chopped slivered almonds work well)

Mix sundried tomatoes, garlic, rosemary and olive oil together.  Stir in diced tomato, and parsley.  Make a slight “trench” in the top of the goat cheese.  Pour mixture  over whole log of goat cheese in trench and sprinkle with nuts.

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